Oct 272015
 

Hungary - Furmint

I spent the last week traveling through time. It’s not something that you get to do every day. And as you might imagine, it was pretty darn memorable.

My companions were an amazing group: Master Sommeliers Peter Granoff and Scott Harper, blogger Joe Roberts, and Debbie Zachareas of the Ferry Plaza Wine Merchant. Experts all, and veterans of many a visit to a famous wine region of the world. And yet this trip was different.

Part of it was the landscape and culture. We were in Tokaji; that legendary region of Hungary where even the language is from a different world—where last names come first, where every word changes depending on its use in the sentence, and where navigating a menu (Étlap, in Magyar) is as mysterious as the cabinet of Dr. Kaligari.

And then there were the wines. We began, as things always do, with dry wines made from the local grapes: furmint, to be sure, but also hárszlevelű, muscat, kabar, zéta, and kövérszőlő. Had many of those recently? The wines were fresh, lively, with great acidity and balance. We were charmed and impressed. In fact, cases, even pallets of wine were ordered for the shops and restaurants back home. They were delicious.

Then they pulled out the big guns: Tokaji Aszú wines made by adding buckets and buckets of botrytis affected grapes to the dry furmint wines. Suddenly the lightness and charm of the wines got wonderfully deeper and richer. Intense flavors, soaring aromatics, and finishes that I can still taste today, if I give myself a chance. We started with current vintages, and then worked backwards into wines that were twenty years old. The seemed fresh and full of vigor.

And five times we were invited to sample a wine historically reserve for the Emperor himself: Esszencia—the pure free-run juice of those Aszú grapes. Beyond nectar. Scott Harper said it best, when he noted that the wine in the glass seemed to be affected by a different level of gravity. Almost no alcohol, because no yeast could prosper in that soup of intense flavors and sugar levels approaching the ionosphere.

Quite an amazing journey. And I look forward to drinking some of these wines thanks to Peter, Scott and Debbie, who are making them available to us. No translation required.

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