Mar 252014
 
Turkish Wine

Courtesy of Wines of Turkey

A five hour drive from Istanbul (not Constantinople 😉 ), Turkey’s Ankara province is home to Vinkara’s main vineyards and winery, which were established by the Gürsel family in 2003 in the village of Kalecik. This newer venture is part of the continued renaissance of Turkey’s viticultural and winemaking history, which originally dates to 7000 BCE.

Like many other Turkish wineries, Vinkara has hired an international consultant – in this case, Italy’s Marco Monchiero – as their winemaker. But, its main focus is decidedly Turkish. Although Vinkara’s plots include international varieties, it is the indigenous Narince and Kalecik Karasi that the company is widely promoting as they debut their wines in the U.S. (Does the world really need another Chardonnay or Merlot?) Moreover, 60% of its plantings are dedicated to Kalecik Karasi, along with the preservation of other important Turkish varieties.

The white Narince (pronounced Nah-rin-djeh), which translates as delicately, hails from the mid-Black Sea region (Tokat), situated a little closer to the coast than Kalecik. This variety is produced by Vinkara in two guises – regular (aka unoaked) and Reserve. The Reserve is treated to 14 months in oak barrels and it unfortunately shows. When tasting the two wines side by side, the overwhelming preference among the four of us was for the unoaked version. Perhaps the variety is just too delicate for so much time in oak (Kavaklidere’s Prestige Narince only spends nine months in oak and seemed much more balanced to my palate on previous tastings).

Also available in unoaked and oaked styles, the Kalecik Karasi (pronounced Kah-le-djic-car-ah-ser) is a red grape whose name stems from its origin’s proximity to the village of Kalecik, translating as “black from the small castle” given that Kalecik is home to –you guessed it– a small castle. This low tannin variety offers lovely freshness and bright red fruit character on the palate. Much less delicate than the Narince, the Reserve Kalecik Karasi wasn’t hurt by its 14 months of oak aging.

Choosing to drink these wines provides a refreshing change of pace, and, with the exception of the Reserve Narince, I found them to be well balanced, well made wines with good fruit, nice acidity and good length.

The company’s circular logo, prominently featured on every bottle, displays not only its name and location, but also the phrase “This is the time, my love, to pour the wine…” And I agree; you might say, it’s a Turkish delight.

For more information on Turkey’s wines, regions and its indigenous grape varieties, please see the Wines of Turkey website.